Tuesday, September 30, 2008


Issho ku ichinichi raku

Even if your wole life is pain
There is just the only enjoyable day

13 Comments:

Blogger Harry said...

Dear Pierre,

I will soon begin to sew a kesa following (as best I can) your instructions on the other blog.

Thank-you very much for this help. I very much enjoyed reading your introductory advice on approaching the task.

I look forward to many beautiful mistakes!

I hope we will all rest safely in the folds of the great robe tonight.

Regards,

Harry.

3:09 PM  
Blogger Pierre Turlur said...

Wonderful! Great news Harry!
Are you sewing a rakusu or a kesa?

Taigu

3:29 AM  
Blogger Harry said...

Pierre,

I wear a rakusu at present which was bestowed upon me by Rev Peter Rocca.

I didn't sew the rakusu, it was sent to us from Japan, so I thought I'd like to try sewing one as well. But after hearing Nishijima Roshi's (and your own) view on any practitioner of zazen wearing the kesa I feel like I'd like to sew a kesa instead.

I have worked out the size of the patches. I'm quite tall, almost 6ft, so my nobechu is 48cm (Ha! sounds very rude in English!)

Regards,

Harry.

4:27 AM  
Blogger Harry said...

Dear Taigu,

In your instructions for making the kesa on your blog is the 'yo' an inserted piece of material or is it simply the area between two main patches that is created by the two rows of stitching?

I have found material and am cutting out the 21 pieces at present.

Thank-you,

Harry.

3:23 AM  
Blogger Pierre Turlur said...

Dear Harry,


The yo is the area between the fold and the line of stitches. BUT, if you sew the kesa using a large piece of fabric with added parts, then yo are all the vertical and horizontal stripes you sew on ( this last technique is rare, yet very interesting).

I am so glad you are starting to sew. This is a wonderful way to manifest deep respect and honor my teacher, Mike Chodo cross, my grand father, nishijima roshi and all the guys before. it is the way to celebrate just sitting and your true self.

Thank you


Taigu

5:41 AM  
Blogger Harry said...

Taigu,

Yes, I understand now that there are these two techniques.

I will soon put some pictures of my effort up on the 'Angry Buddhists' blog if you'd like to see how its going.

Thanks & Regards,

Harry.

6:33 AM  
Blogger KiranLaxmiAnand said...

Hi !

Enjoyed your this post!

K

3:28 AM  
Blogger Harry said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

4:46 PM  
Blogger Harry said...

Taigu,

http://www.buddhasrobeissewn.org/

Have you read this?

Is it useful?

Regards,

Harry.

2:07 PM  
Blogger Pierre Turlur said...

Thanks K...I suppose the one to thank is you for saying such a wonderful thing...

Harry, many thanks, I did not know about the book. If it is useful, it is not interesting. If it is useless, it is just great! I think this book was written by another lover of the kesa like me. Very useless book, Harry. Written by a guy like me, just good for writing cheap poetry, loving a beautiful woman and this great big life...and sewing kesa...
take care Harry and please, carry on with this endless useless practice. Everything is just perfect as it is. Useless.

7:50 AM  
Blogger Harry said...

Dear Taigu,

A cucumber and a piece rope are wonderful and they expound the Dharma perfectly... but do we use them as a needle and thread for sewing together the pieces of a Buddha's robe?

I have so many books about Buddhism which are useless and some which I now realize as useful and some which even clarify uselessness in the Dharma.

Being really useless, I think, avoids the potentially nihilistic extreme of not being of use... there is clearly 'useful' and useful in the Dharma.

Regards,

Harry.

8:07 AM  
Blogger Pierre Turlur said...

Indeed...
just an invitation to go further Harry.
Useless is the most important quality of real Dharma.
The piece of rope and the cucumber wiil be sewn into your kesa, as much as everything else, just through this useless quality.

9:05 PM  
Blogger Harry said...

Yes, our Masters explain it very clearly, without ambiguity.

Regards,

Harry.

9:21 PM  

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